LDS Boy Scouting

Training for LDS Boy Scout Leaders

 

Funding

Church Budget Guidelines

2004 Change in Church Budget Guidelines: Local Unit Budget Allowance Increase

In April 2004 the Presiding Bishopric announced a change in the formula for calculating the amount of budget funds allocated to Church units: The local unit budget allowance is being increased to help wards and stakes fund activities for children, youth, and young single adults. . . . The increase in the local unit budget allowance is intended to fund activities more effectively and to relieve the financial burden on families. With this increase, fund-raising activities should be substantially reduced or eliminated. Stake presidents should be sensitive to the financial needs of wards and ensure that they have adequate funds to support a broad scope of youth activities such as . . . Cub Scout day camp and overnight camps for 11-year-old Scouts. . . . Youth weekly activities. Summer camps. Boy Scout awards. Duty to God and Young Womanhood Recognition. Combined youth activities. . . . Athletic programs and events.

Scout leaders should check with local priesthood leaders to determine the extent to which fund-raising activities may be conducted in their local units.

Local Unit Budget Allowance Increase

When planning major activities, ward leaders must keep in mind the recent changes in the local unit budget allowance guidelines, increasing funds for some ward organizations. In April 2004 the Presiding Bishopric announced a change in the formula for calculating the amount of budget funds allocated to Church units:

The local unit budget allowance is being increased to help wards and stakes fund activities for children, youth, and young single adults. . . . The increase in the local unit budget allowance is intended to fund activities more effectively and to relieve the financial burden on families. With this increase, fund-raising activities should be substantially reduced or eliminated. Stake presidents should be sensitive to the financial needs of wards and ensure that they have adequate funds to support a broad scope of youth activities such as . . . Cub Scout day camp and overnight camps for 11-year-old Scouts. . . . Youth weekly activities. Summer camps. Boy Scout awards. Duty to God and Young Womanhood Recognition. Combined youth activities. . . . Athletic programs and events.

Scout leaders should check with local priesthood leaders to determine the extent to which fund-raising activities may be conducted in their local units.

Church Budget Allowance Guidelines

The Church provides stakes with a quarterly budget allowance. The rules for managing this allowance are printed in the publication, Budget Allowance Guidelines, published in 1998, with an update issued in April 2004 Excerpts relevant to Scouting are provided below.

Although these guidelines contain many specific instructions, most questions about budget allowance can be answered by examining the four basic principles that govern budget allowance:

  • The budget allowance program was created to reduce the financial and time burdens on members.
  • Members should not pay fees or be assessed to participate in Church programs.
  • Priesthood and auxiliary leaders should reduce and simplify activities wherever possible.
  • Activities should be planned at little or no cost, should build testimonies, and should provide meaningful service to others.

 Funding Youth Activities

  1. Stakes and wards should fund all youth activities, including Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Young Women, and Primary activities, from the budget allowance. The only exceptions are covered in numbers 2, 3, and 5 below and should be avoided if possible.
  2. If budget allowance funds are insufficient, young men and young women may individually earn their own money for the cost of one annual camp. (Annual day camp experiences for Cub Scouts also qualify as annual camps.)
  3. If budget allowance funds are insufficient and young men and young women are unable to individually earn enough for the one annual camp, they may hold group fund-raising activities. This should be done only as a last resort.
  4. Wards should not charge young men and young women (including Cub Scouts and Primary children) fees or dues for weekly or monthly activities.
  5. Young men and young women (and Cub Scouts) may hold group fund-raising activities to pay for equipment for the unit if there is not sufficient budget allowance.

Fund-raising Guidelines for Annual Camps and Equipment. Those conducting fund-raising activities should:

  1. Comply with tax and liability guidelines presented in the Church Handbook of Instructions, book 1, section
  2. Not sell products or services door-to-door.
  3. Provide meaningful value or service.
  4. Provide a positive experience and build harmony and unity within the group.
  5. Obtain the bishop’s approval for the activity.

Priesthood leaders should take special care to see that members are not made to feel obligated to contribute to fundraising activities. Contributions should be voluntary.

Scouting Activities

Registration. Stakes should register all young men ages 8 – 15 in Scouting. They should register young men ages 16 – 17 in Scouting when they are pursuing rank advancements or when stake presidents and bishops choose to sponsor Venturing [crews] for young men of this age. Stakes should also register adult leaders.

Stakes should pay for unit chartering and Scout registration for youth and leaders from the stake general checking account. These expenses will be reimbursed 100 percent if the stake financial clerk marks the “Other” box and prints the R code in the space provided. The registration fee includes insurance for each Scout. Stakes should not pay an extra fee for insurance.

Camping and Other Activities

Wards should pay for all camps and activities from the budget allowance, with the possible exception of the one annual camp. Purchasing personal equipment, magazines, and uniforms is the responsibility of each young man. Bishops should be aware of the financial situations of young men in their wards and should ensure that financial constraints do not prohibit a young man from fully participating in activities. Fast offering funds should not be used for these activities.

Scout Shows. Church Scouting units may participate and benefit from the sale of tickets for Scout-o-rama, Scoutexpo, show-and-do events, or Scout fairs, provided the events are not connected to sales or distribution of fundraising items, such as candy bars, light bulbs, popcorn, and similar items.

No Scout Checking Accounts. No separate Scout checking accounts are authorized. Wards should account for Scout funds in the “Other” category of the Church unit checking account.

Friends of Scouting (FOS)

“Friends of Scouting” fund drive for an LDS Scout Unit is directed by each LDS Ward’s Bishopric and usually is conducted annually. Everyone is asked to contribute what he or she can to help support Scouting. The money goes to the council to support the council camps, the training programs, and the council and district programs.

With the changes in funding for the Boy Scouts of America, it is very important for LDS units to support the local council through donations to Friends of Scouting. To maintain quality Scouting programs, the council needs financial support from all units. Supporting activities like Cub Scout Day Camp and Boy Scout Camp, selling Popcorn, and writing a check to Friends of Scouting, makes a difference. During the Unit’s Blue and Gold or Scout Banquet, a District representative can be invited to provide a short (very short) presentation on the Friends of Scouting.

Friends of Scouting Fund (U.S. Only). Stakes and wards should not use the budget allowance to subsidize the Friends of Scouting fund. Stake presidents and bishops should insure that all members fully understand the importance of supporting this activity and should provide them with the opportunity to contribute.

Any contribution to the Friends of Scouting fund should be a voluntary contribution to the Boy Scouts of America by Scouters and friends of Scouting. These funds provide financial support for the local Boy Scouts of America council, and checks should be made payable to Boy Scouts of America.

Contributions to the Friends of Scouting fund should not be deposited to or commingled with the Church Unit Checking Account. Checks should, where practical, be given directly to the designated representative of the local Boy Scouts of America council in the envelope provided by the council. When this is not possible, the collected funds may be deposited to the ward account in “Other” and a check written to the Boy Scouts of America for the full amount collected. Cub packs, Scout troops, Varsity teams, and Venturing [crews] are not authorized to retain any portion of these donations.

Stakes, wards, or members should not be assessed a fixed amount. However, stakes are encouraged to contribute an amount in proportion to the number of young men registered. Area Presidencies, Area Authority Seventies, and stake presidencies should not pressure local units to raise specified amounts.

Pack, Troop, Team and Crew

Stakes are not chartered organizations, and therefore do not register boys or adults in Scouting. The stake does, however, pay the registration fee for boys and adults who are registered with the ward Scout units.

The Church is covered by a blanket policy, which is, however, only secondary coverage (for medical expenses exceeding those reimbursed by one’s own insurance company).

Boys’ Life Magazine. A subscription to Boys’ Life magazine is encouraged but optional. If a Scout wants the magazine, he should pay for it himself. [There are two different monthly editions of Boys’ Life: one for Cub Scouts (ages six to ten) and one for Boy Scouts (ages eleven to eighteen).]

Food for Activities

Wards should generally pay for food for activities from the budget allowance. Wards may hold potluck-type activities but should not place undue burdens on members.

Adult Leader Uniform

Adult leaders set an example for the boys and wear the uniform and insignia for the position they hold. Boy Scout Leaders wear the red epaulets on a khakis shirt.

A Uniform Guide provides instructions on where to place the patches. A special position patch is available through the Salt Lake Distribution Center.

Scouting Costs

Because Boy Scouts is the activity program for young men 8 years of age through 18, the Stake pays all boy and adult registration fees. It is important to register all boys even if they do not participate in all activities.

Registration & Insurance Fee: $10.00 / Year Fee paid by Stake

Boys’ Life Magazine: $10.80 / Year

Boy Scout Handbook $7.95 – Boy Scout use the book for all ranks

Note: Uniforms and Boys’ Life are not required to join Scouts, but they are recommended. Often uniforms can be purchased from a thrift shop or the Unit may have a uniform exchange. The Patrol chooses a Patrol patch and the Troop selects a neckerchief for all Scouts in the Troop. The prices listed below are subject to change. Visit TUwww.Scoutstuff.orgUT for additional items and information.

Boy Scout Shirt, Long SleeveBoy Scout (Red) Shoulder LoopsBoy Scout Trousers – Size 22

Merit Badge Sash – 30-inch

Boy Scout Cap – Size: SM/M

Boy Scout Crew Socks – Size

Boy Scout Belt – Size SM/M

Council Strip Patch – Obtain from local council

Patrol Emblem (Patrol Selected)

Unit Numeral

Scout Advancement Trail Kit

One-Color Neckerchief (Troop Selected)

Boy Scout Neckerchief Slide

$28.70$1.65$36.30

$5.15

$11.50

$4.40

$6.15

$2.50

$1.75

$0.80

$3.25

$4.95

$2.20

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